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-philosophy-

As a child growing up I had no interest in reading fantasy or science fiction books-a great contrast to the rest of my family. I devoured all the biographical books and articles I could find. I especially liked reading about inventors, explorers and scientists. My fascination was more than about their accomplishments; it was an appreciation for their determination. These people placed all they had in what they believed, they were willing to take chances, and were willing to risk their lives. They gave me a glimpse into the possibilities in the world. Anything could be accomplished if you had the determination, drive and belief in yourself.

My entire family is rooted in the hard sciences; physics, chemistry and mathematics. The explanation of the world, what exists and how it works drives them to explore and learn. They are happy in this never-ending journey, always traveling down new paths looking for answers. I am not interested in explaining the world, but to put it into a different context. I examine parts of society and nature to bring awareness to these elements and alter the viewer’s perceptions. My goal is to make them look at things a bit different and consider the world they live in more closely.

As an artist I do not have the answers, I feel my role is more like an activist. I do not create work with a political agenda nor have a politically motivated view. My role is to bring awareness to the society in which we live and to the subjects, objects and ideas that permeate our culture in a subordinate or subversive manner.

My current work explores botanical forms, the lack of interaction between man and nature, our disconnection from this environment and the ‘artificalization’ of nature, natural spaces and all things living. These sculptures talk about organization and the chaotic nature within natural and man-made forms. I look at how items are composed and they’re many parts, then abstract their elements-keeping true to there inherit qualities. Some sculptures are more organic in form as if growing or flowing from group to group, mimicking ivy or spring flowers sprouting here and there. All a combination of a systematic organization of natural forms possessing a chaotic multi-layered visual effect creating a metaphor of our world, dominated by its rapid pace and over-stimulation.

--Rick Herzog-- --© 2011--